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Rossendale Harriers Tag

Black Combe AM - 13km (8m)/1000m (3281ft) Sat 12th March 2016 You've got to love racing! It's not only one of the few times I'm allowed out with a responsible adult present, but often it's the banter and surprises that make the day unforgettable. Responsible adult duties were taken on by Mr Tinman, who it was revealed does lots of very grown-up stuff and is often called upon as double act to high profile politicians; not sure if he's Ant or Dec though - but who is? Filling a two hour drive of pre-race chat is not as difficult as it sounds and with a packed car of five fell runners and kit, banter soon turns to recent race performances and the explanation of the the not so politically correct term 'chicked'. Obviously used by the yoof, I had no idea, a description of the superior prowess of a female athlete compared to your own...

Different races are great for different reasons. Everyone has their favourites. It could be the landscape, maybe the long history of legends who have won it. It might be the pie & pint in the pub at the end. It could be that they're just really bloody hard. Then there are a few special races that are all of these things rolled into one, and therefore romantically referred to as The Lakeland Classics. An elite series of races. All tough, all long (or super long) and all on every fellrunner's wish list. Originally set up to save a collection of races from extinction, due to runner numbers being on a steep decline, a time based (not position) scoring system was set up as a series and The Lakeland Classics Trophy was formed. Most people just love having a go and being part of these great races, perhaps dreaming of a top...

At the foot of Ben Nevis the traditional bag piper led a four hundred strong parade of athletes to the start line. A grand total of seventeen Rossendale Harriers (which must be the highest number ever?) took their place and waited for the starter's gun. Even the shy Scottish sun turned up to be part of, what was going to be, a great afternoon of true mountain racing. [caption id="attachment_349" align="alignleft" width="300"] Sam Tosh 3rd to summit[/caption] Rossendale's leading light Sam Tosh kept good company with an early group of front-runners. Including Ricky Lightfoot, Martin Mikkleson-Barron, Robb Jebb, and Finlay Wild. The group slowly started to stretch out as Wild topped the mountain first. With the others only seconds behind, the race would be, as they say it always is, won on the decent. And it was. Wild bound past me as I continued the long upwards struggle.  The others soon followed, but...

Event report by Jon Tinman Ever wondered what it would feel like to run 3 races - road,  trail and fell - in 3 days? First race - Friday 12th June 7.30 pm - 6 miles on the road from Norden up Edenfield Road and back through Ashworth Valley. There was a good turnout from Rossendale Harriers: 6 women and 5 men for all 3 races. It was hot and humid and it kept threatening rain. I prayed for rain but none came before we set off at a daft pace up Edenfield Road.  Ashley Holt played a waiting game and strolled home in 4th. Lorraine Hopley made her intentions clear from the off, finishing first woman home. For me, not having done any road races, the pace and intensity was a bit of an eye opener, to say the least. I had managed, just about, to keep pace with John Ealing....

Midgley Moor (BS) 28 February '15 5mile/1250ft climb` [caption id="attachment_267" align="aligncenter" width="676"] Thornton Taylor and Michael Toman battling[/caption] A record number of entries registered at the pretty setting of Booth cricket club for the Midgley Moor race. This was thanks in part, to the race being the first counter in the Run the Moors Grand Prix which acts as a joint club championship for several clubs from the South West Pennine area. [caption id="attachment_280" align="aligncenter" width="662"] Jeff Hignett on the way out[/caption] Pre race chat was dominated by route choice. A rarity in shorter races but this would surely have a part to play. Although the majority of the race is unflagged, I think you’d struggle to get properly lost, unless it was really claggy. However, vital seconds, minutes even, could be gained by picking the best lines. [caption id="attachment_269" align="alignleft" width="300"] Janet Howarth looking far  happier than her brother Will (below) at this point.[/caption] The race starts...

Wadsworth Trog 7 February ‘15 20m with 1220m/4003ft climb The first proper long race of the 2015 calendar drew a good field, including several Rossendale Harriers. The race has a reputation of being a bit tough. Mainly due to the time of year, I suppose. Conditions on the day however seemed pretty good to me. The recent heavy snow had started to clear but with still enough ice about to keep the infamous bogs, well some of them at least, at bay. The course changed slightly this year to avoid some sensitive land issues with Natural England. Most of the original navigation section, across large sections of pathless moor, was to be avoided. This was a shame because that was a big part of the character of the Trog. This has been replaced with, what I have to admit, is a nicer route and nicer to run on, but is fell running supposed...

Lee Mill Relay. 4 legs . 4 runners. Report by Richard Stott, Race organizer Well, that seemed to go OK. The inaugural Lee Mill Relay was held on 14th December as Rossendale’s new 4 runner fell relay event, and hopefully to become an established fixture on the Fell Race Calendar. I thought it might be interesting for runners to take a look at a race from the organizers point of view. Perhaps providing them with a better understanding of what is involved in organizing a race, rather than just competing in one. For me, when racing, a winter fell relay was always a great way of ending the year. I've done the Calderdale Relay, probably over 20 times, and always enjoyed the relay format and atmosphere of all the club members being involved, but especially the added challenge that winter brings. I have to admit I was quite critical on the Fell Running forum...

Grin ‘N’ Bear it / 15.9m, 1939ft / Race Report by Richard Campbell While the bulk of the Rossendale Harriers troops were holding the fort over on North eastern front with a big turn out at the Shepherds Skyline fell race, I went on a solo mission deep behind enemy lines, on the eastern front at Langsett, South Yorkshire. For the 16 mile Grin ’N’ Bear it Fell Race in the Peak District National Park. Fact of the day & touristy bit for the road fairies! The Peak District is the second most visited National Park in the world after Mount Fuji in Japan. Without a mega early start and the usual drive up to the lakes to endure Jason Craven's M6 Farleton Knot Fell Race tourettes. It was just a shorter drive over Woodhead Pass to Langsett Barn. Getting there nice & early for race registration & kit check. While donning my mudclaws, which I...

A 4 leg relay. Leg 1 single. Leg 2 pair. Leg 3 pair (navigation). leg 4 single. Middleton Fells (nr Kirby Lonsdale) 19 October 2014 If you’re walking your dog passed Marl Pits car park in the dead of night around this time next year and you see flashing headlights in the car park and you also hear raised voices talking of ‘pairing up’ and ‘a good leg’. If you can make out several people getting in and out of several vehicle’s at the same time. Then please do not ring the Police. Davina has enough on her plate organising the British Fell Running Relays relays as it is. At this rate we’ll have to start meeting at a quieter car park like Crown Point or something. Oh wait, Hang on…. We arrived at Middleton Fell to quite an odd sight with each of the 200 or so teams setting up their club tent...

6 September 2014 - 8.7m / 4419ft. [caption id="attachment_5" align="alignright" width="300"] Mr Miyagi used to be Scott Hitchen's coach apparantley[/caption] A dozen Rossendale Harriers huddled together at the start line of 2014 Ben Nevis Fell race. I don't know who was more apprehensive; those of us who hadn't done the race before, with the fear of the unknown. Or those with past experience, who knew exactly what they were in for. The main topic of pre-race talk was the unavoidable ‘Yes or No’ debate. Yes – I do think I can do it in less than two hours. Or No I can’t. Apart from Joe Johnston of course who would’ve had to have worn clown shoes to come in over that time. As the runners gathered behind the bag pipers I asked Andy Lee (he’d done it once or twice) if he had any advise for a first timer - "Never look up." [caption...